Beal na Banna Vid 1 (1)

Explore Nearby

Located on the Causeway Coast, Béal na Banna is just a 5 minute drive to Coleraine town centre, 5 minutes to Castlerock, 15 minutes to Portstewart and Portrush and 1 hour from Belfast.

The property boasts views of Mussenden temple and Downhill castle and is a perfect base for exploring other areas of the idyllic North Coast including the Giant’s Causeway, Carrick-a-Rede Rope bridge, Dunluce castle, Old Bushmills Distillery and the local blue flag beaches.

 

Mussenden Temple and Downhill Demesne (10mins) 

 

Mussenden Temple is located in the beautiful surroundings of Downhill Demesne near Castlerock in County Londonderry. It perches dramatically on a 120 ft cliff top, high above the Atlantic Ocean on the north-western coast of Northern Ireland, offering spectacular views westwards over Downhill Strand towards Magilligan Point and County Donegal and to the east Castlerock beach towards Portstewart, Portrush and Fair Head.

Explore Downhill Demesne and enjoy a stunning cliff top walks around this diverse historical site. Unfortunately Mussenden Temple interior will not be accessible but we hope you enjoy viewing the grandeur of this iconic building from the outside. The temple was built in 1785 and forms part of the estate of Frederick Augustus Hervey, Bishop of Derry and Earl of Bristol (or the Earl Bishop). The temple was built as a summer library and its architecture was inspired by the Temple of Vesta in Tivoli, near Rome. It is dedicated to the memory of Hervey’s cousin Frideswide Mussenden and uniquely reflects the personality of its flamboyant creator.

Both the Temple and the breath-taking views are among the most photographed scenes in Ireland. Over the years the Temple itself was under danger of being lost to the sea due to the erosion of the cliff which brought Mussenden Temple ever closer to the edge. In 1997 the National Trust then carried out cliff stabilisation work to prevent the loss of this lovely building.

The living area has large patio doors and windows which look out onto the River Bann, the Atlantic Ocean, the hills of Donegal and some of the North Coast’s most iconic landmarks – Downhilll Demesne and Mussenden temple.

Mussenden Temple

Dunluce Castle (20mins)

 

Dunluce is one of the most picturesque and romantic of Irish Castles. With evidence of settlement from the first millennium, the present castle ruins date mainly from the 16th and 17th centuries. It was inhabited by both the feuding McQuillan and MacDonnell clans. Historical and archaeological exhibits are on display for public viewing.

 

The iconic ruin of Dunluce Castle bears witness to a long and tumultuous history. First built on the dramatic coastal cliffs of north County Antrim by the MacQuillan family around 1500, the earliest written record of the castle was in 1513. It was seized by the ambitious MacDonnell clan in the 1550s, who set about stamping their mark on the castle under the leadership of the famous warrior chieftain Sorely Boy MacDonnell during an era of violence, intrigue and rebellion. In the 17th century Dunluce was the seat of the earls of Antrim and saw the establishment of a small town in 1608. Visitors can explore the findings of archaeological digs within the cobbled streets and stone merchants’ houses of the long-abandoned Dunluce Town. The dramatic history of Dunluce is matched by tales of a banshee and how the castle kitchens fell into the sea one stormy night in 1639.

 

Opening Hours: Please check before visiting as public access may be restricted.   Regular opening hours are February to November: Daily 9.30am to 5pm. December/January: Daily 9.30am to 4pm. Note: Last admission 30 minutes before closing. Admission charges apply. A Dunluce Castle app for iPhone and android devices is available free of charge from the App Store and Google Play.

Nearby Magheracross Viewing Point and picnic area is an excellent spot to stop and take in the stunning, coastal scenery, often missed when travelling by car along the coast road.

Dunluce Castle

Old Bushmills Distillery (20mins)

 

Bushmills Irish Whiskey is made at the world’s oldest licenced working distillery in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, on the beautiful North Coast. The original grant to distil was signed in 1608 by King James 1st and there has been distillation on this site since then, using the unique water from our own stream and Irish barley. We are more than 400 years old. Experience the rich aromas and full- bodied flavours of Ireland’s oldest working distillery (1608) by pre-booking one of our tutored tasting events. Choose from several options ranging from a virtual tour to an hour- long run through of our exclusive brands with our trained whiskey educators.

Bushmills Distillery

Giants Causeway (30mins)

 

Flanked by the wild North Atlantic Ocean and a landscape of dramatic cliffs, the Giant’s Causeway, Northern Ireland’s first UNESCO Heritage Site is a geological wonder and home to a wealth of history and legend. The 40,000 basalt stone columns left by volcanic eruptions 60 million years ago, has captured the imagination of all who see it. Recognised as one of Northern Ireland’s most precious landscapes is cared for by the National Trust, a registered conservation charity founded to protect beautiful and special places for ever, for everyone.

Giant's Causeway

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge (35mins)

 

Carrick-a-Rede one of Northern Ireland’s most loved attractions in Northern Ireland, cared for by the National Trust, a registered conservation charity founded to protect beautiful and special places for ever, for everyone. Connected to the cliffs by a rope bridge across the Atlantic Ocean, Carrick-a-Rede Island (home to a single building – a fisherman’s cottage) is the final destination. Suspended almost 100ft (30m) above sea level, the rope bridge was first erected by salmon fishermen 350 years ago. Crossing the Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge is an exhilarating experience, high above the water and open to the elements. Thousands of people come every year to blow out the cobwebs, see beautiful coastal scenery, and spot rare wildlife. Pre-booking is essential. The National Trust limit the number of people who can cross the bridge in any given hour.

Carrick-a-rede rope bridge

Rathlin Island (40mins)

 

Amidst the rugged landscape of this beautiful island let your mind wander and discover a tranquillity and beauty that is so unexpected. The ferry to Rathlin Island travels just six miles across the Sea of Moyle. This island is six miles long, one mile wide, “L” shaped and home to a slowly increasing population of around 140 people.

A short walk from the harbour is the Boathouse Visitor Centre (Seasonal) where visitors can discover some of the exciting history, learn about present day island life and see some artefacts from shipwrecks around the island. Enjoy many of the walks the Island has to offer including along the shore to Mill Bay where you may see some of the resident seals basking or at play. Cycle hire is another way to enjoy the island or take a bus trip.

 

From April to July is puffin season so don’t miss the opportunity to see them along with lots of other sea birds. The re-furbished seabird centre is open to the public from 29 May with the added bonus of being able to explore a real working lighthouse which is now part of the Great Lighthouses of Ireland tour.

Many tales of myth and mystery surround Rathlin; perhaps the most famous tells of Robert the Bruce. In 1306, the Scottish King took refuge on Rathlin where he watched a spider persevering again and again to bridge a gap with its web. Eventually it succeeded. Taking heart from the spider’s efforts, he returned to Scotland and eventually regained his crown.

 

The island has a range of accommodation to suit different needs, a pub, restaurant, community shop and gift shop, offering Rathlin produced crafts. ‘Breakwater Studio’ features the work of local artist Yvonne Braithwaite, Islander Kelp, Rathlin Pony Trekking, North coast Nature Photography Workshops.